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University of Glasgow

Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering
Universities of Glasgow and Strathclyde

The Programmes

MSc/PGDip in Marine Technology

The course is designed to give graduates an opportunity to specialise in any combination of a wide range of areas in Marine Technology, including advanced naval architecture, safety management, hydrodynamics, structural reliability and offshore engineering. Operating within the EPSRC-supported postgraduate training programme of Strathclyde University's Engineering Faculty, the course allows students to come into contact with those in other engineering courses and thus develop multidisciplinary interests and skills.

The main objectives of the course are:
1. To produce high-calibre engineers trained to postgraduate level and well-versed in advanced engineering in Marine Technology and related fields.
2. To offer able and mature practising engineers a full- or part-time programme to enhance their qualifications and skills.

MSc/PGDip in Marine Engineering

This course is designed to give graduates an opportunity to expand their knowledge and research skill in Marine Engineering which deals with on-board machinery and equipment such as engines, propulsion equipment, generators, electrical systems, cargo handling gear and control systems.

The main objectives of the course are:
1. To produce graduates of high calibre with in-depth knowledge in Marine Engineering capable of making significant contributions to the industry.
2. To provide graduate engineers of related disciplines an opportunity to acquire advanced knowledge in Marine Engineering.
3. To provide sea-going engineers an opportunity to deepen their knowledge and expand their experience for design, supervision and management roles.

MSc/PGDip in Technical Management of Ship Operations

This course is designed to give graduate engineers and well-qualified sea-going personnel with sufficient experience an opportunity to acquire knowledge and skills required for technical ship management. The course allows students to come into contact with those in other branches of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering and thus develop multidisciplinary interests and skills. The course contents include subjects a deep understanding of which is essential for effective and efficient management of ships and fleets. These include Ship Management, Inspection and Survey, Safety and Risk Management, Regulatory Framework, Waterborne Transportation Systems.

The main objectives of the course are:
1. To produce graduates of high calibre with in-depth knowledge in ship operations capable of making significant contributions to the industry as technical superintendents.
2. To provide graduate naval architects with a deeper understanding of shipping industry and ship operations.
3. To provide graduate engineers of related disciplines an opportunity to acquire advanced knowledge in ship operations.

Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering (NAME)


The two sister departments of the Universities of Glasgow and Strathclyde merged to become the Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering (NAME) in 2001. The merged Department is a unique provider in Scotland of education in naval architecture and marine engineering. It is jointly owned by both universities, allowing students to enjoy the facilities of both universities.

The merger brought together complementary expertise to form a centre of international excellence in teaching and research. The foundation of the new Department is a shared history of over 120 years of key contributions to international maritime industries and to academia. Thousands of graduates spanning the globe have had a profound effect in shaping the evolution of modern naval architecture worldwide.

Teaching is based at Strathclyde's John Anderson Campus in the city centre of Glasgow, within easy reach of public transport from all over Glasgow and the West of Scotland. Research activities are based at the John Anderson Campus and at Glasgow's Acre Road Hydrodynamics Facility, located at the West of Scotland Science Park, in the north west of the city.

The Department’s top priority is “to produce graduates who possess an ample and balanced supply of competence, confidence and communication skills whilst instilling in students professional ethos and zest for life-long learning”. With these qualities, our graduates can take up challenging careers and make positive contributions to their chosen parts of the marine industries. This is achieved through a balance of scholarship, innovative teaching and applied research. The performance of our graduates working in diverse areas of the industry has amply justified this policy.

The Department is a friendly place to study. Since it is relatively small (compared to other Engineering departments), and self-contained in its own building, students will quickly get to know the staff, and vice versa. As a result the atmosphere is good, and there are plenty of people who can help with any difficulties our students may face, both with academic and with non-academic matters.

NAME currently enjoys a worldwide reputation as a leading institution of teaching and research in maritime engineering.

The Universities


The University of Glasgow dates from the middle of the fifteenth century. In 1451, the Scottish King James II persuaded Pope Nicholas V to grant a bull authorising Bishop Turnbull of Glasgow to set up a university. Thus, 40 years after the creation of St Andrew's University, Scotland, like England, could boast two Universities. Modeled on the University of Bologna, Glasgow was, and has remained, a University in the great European tradition.

For its first two centuries the young institution operated from Glasgow Cathedral and temporary accommodation nearby. In the seventeenth century, the University moved to its first permanent home in a building on the High Street, subsequently known as the “Old College” and described by contemporaries as “the chief ornament of the city”. The University played a distinguished part in the Enlightenment and in fostering research and enquiry that prepared the ground for the Industrial Revolution in which the city of Glasgow was to play a world role. The industrial expansion it had helped to shape caused the University to move to its present site in what was then suburban Gilmorehill, a location it has occupied since 1870. Here the University is celebrating its 556th anniversary in 2007.

The University has been home to many famous scientists and engineers, including Kelvin and Rankine, who made substantial contributions to modern Naval Architecture through pioneering work on fluid flow around ships. In 1883 the first Professorship of Naval Architecture in the world was created at the University of Glasgow, marking the beginning of Department of Naval Architecture at Glasgow. Increased activities in the Offshore Industries saw the creation of the Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering in 1974, which in 2001 formed one of the partners in the new merged Department.

The evolution of the University of Strathclyde is complex. It began in 1796 when John Anderson, Professor of Natural Philosophy at Glasgow University, left in his will instructions for “a place of useful learning”, a university open to everyone. His vision was realised and Anderson's University opened its first premises in High Street, Glasgow, in late 1796. It moved to George Street and developed rapidly throughout the nineteenth century. By the 1890s, Anderson's University had become a major technological institution with a wide reputation for research and learning.

Rapid expansion meant money was needed for a new building. A successful fund raising campaign by the governors of the time - stalwarts of Victorian Glasgow - resulted in the construction of the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College Building (now the Royal College Building) in George Street. When it opened in 1910, this was the largest building in Europe dedicated to technical education. Shortly afterwards, the institution was renamed the Royal Technical College.

During the next 50 years, the College consolidated its reputation in technical education and research. It was known for producing some of the best scientists and engineers of its time. In the late 50s and early 60s the institution wanted to broaden its activities. The College merged with the Scottish College of Commerce, which offered a wide range of business and arts subjects. Shortly afterwards, in 1964, the enlarged Royal College was granted the Royal Charter and became the University of Strathclyde. Since its foundations over 200 years ago, the University has evolved and expanded, while remaining true to the vision of its founder - to be a place of useful learning for all.

Teaching in Naval Architecture started in Anderson’s University in 1882, principally for part-time study. Full-time courses were offered once the Royal College became the University of Strathclyde. The department was renamed Ship and Marine Technology in the 1970’s and celebrated its centenary in 1982.

Today, the Universities of Glasgow and Strathclyde are amongst the UK's leading Universities with international reputations for teaching and research and important roles in the cultural and commercial life of the Glasgow, Scotland and the UK.

Address Information:

Address Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering
Universities of Glasgow and Strathclyde
100 Montrose Street
Glasgow G4 0LZ
United Kingdom
Tel. No. +44 (0) 141 548 4094
Fax No. +44 (0) 141 552 2879
E-mail address dept@na-me.ac.uk
Programmes MSc/PGDip in Marine Technology
MSc/PGDip in Marine Engineering
MSc/PGDip/PGCert in Technical Management of Ship Operations
MPhil, PhD
Type of courses Full-time
Length of course The normal duration of the taught MSc course is twelve months; and nine months for PGDip. Either course may be undertaken on a part-time basis over twenty-four months. Some candidates with lower qualifications may be required to undertake additional modules.

Postgraduate degrees can be obtained purely through research work. The minimum duration is 12 months for MSc by research and 3 years for PhD, full time.
Date of commencement Date of commencement: Beginning October each year
Application deadlines: There is no formal closing date for applications, but early application is advised (preferably by 31 March).
Accommodation The University of Strathclyde has a Campus Village within a short walking distance from the Department. Over 1,440 students live in the University's campus village in the heart of the John Anderson Campus. A further 400 live in University accommodation within close walking distance of the Campus. The Accommodation Unit also keeps a list of private sector rented accommodation, and this can be consulted at the office of the Residence and Catering Services.
Fees for Session 2007/08 Full-time home (including all EU) students £3,235
Overseas students £11,025
Student grants/
Financial Assistance
There are some studentships from UK EPSRC for home students. Partial studentships may be available for students from other EU nations.

There are a limited number of BG/British Chevening scholarships for overseas students (mainly for those from the Indian subcontinent). If you think you are eligible for any of these scholarships and you are not given an application form, please request one from the Registry or contact us. Some students from EU applying for PGDip study may be eligible for fees-only support from SAAS. Please consult their website www.saas.gov.uk for your eligibility.
Admission requirements English Language Requirement
Most students whose mother tongue is not English will be required to prove that they have sufficient fluency in English. The normal standard required is IELTS 6.5, TOEFL 600 or TOEFL 250 (computer-based test). Students who obtained their first degree taught in English and those from certain countries may be exempt from this requirement. Applicants who have marginally lower scores of the above tests may be required to attend one or more modules of the pre-session English course offered by Strathclyde University's English Language Teaching Division (ELTD).

MSc/PGDip in Marine Technology
The normal qualification for MSc course is a BEng with second class Honours or better. Marginally lower qualifications will be considered for PGDip. PGDip candidates who perform well in the taught classes may be considered for transfer to MSc degree course, if so wished.
Overseas applicants and unconventional qualifications will be judged on a case-by-case basis.
Students with a Diploma from some approved overseas institutions (for example Norwegian Høgskolen) may be admitted into a specially designed two-year course.

MSc/PGDip in Marine Engineering
The normal qualification for MSc course is a BEng with second class Honours or better. Marginally lower qualifications will be considered for PGDip. PGDip candidates who perform well in the taught classes may be considered for transfer to MSc degree course, if so wished.
Overseas applicants and unconventional qualifications will be judged on a case-by-case basis. Applicants with sea-going experience are invited to specify their experience relevant to the course.
Students with a Diploma from some approved overseas institutions (for example Norwegian Høgskolen) may be admitted into a specially designed two-year course.

MSc/PGDip/PGCert in Technical Management of Ship Operations
The normal qualification for MSc course is a BEng with second class Honours or better. Additionally candidates with Master's Certificate or Chief Engineer's Certificate with substantial seagoing experience at a senior level will also be considered for the MSc course. Marginally lower qualifications will be considered for PGDip and PGCert. PGDip candidates who perform well in the taught classes may be considered for transfer to MSc degree course, if so wished.
Overseas applicants and unconventional qualifications will be judged on a case-by-case basis. Applicants with sea-going experience are invited to specify their experience relevant to the course.
Students with a Diploma from some approved overseas institutions (for example Norwegian Høgskolen) may be admitted into a specially designed two-year course.
Student Profile 1.Countries of origin (number): 15
2. Ratio Men/Women: 10-1
3. Age Range: 25 - 40
4. Average Age: 28
5. Average Work Experience: 3 years
Contact person Dr. B.S. Lee
Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering
Universities of Glasgow & Strathclyde
100 Montrose Street
Glasgow G4 0LZ
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 141 548 3070
Fax: +44 141 552 2879
Email: b.s.lee@na-me.ac.uk


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